Common Aboriginal Sixties Scoop Questions

Aboriginal Sixties Scoop FAQs

What is a class action?

A class action is a lawsuit that groups people with a common claim together against the same defendant. Class action suits allow people whose voices might otherwise go unheard to fight together for a common interest. For more information on class action lawsuits visit //www.callkleinlawyers.com/faqs/.

What is this lawsuit about?

This class action lawsuit concerns the practice of removing large numbers of Indian children from their families and communities and placing them in the care of non-Aboriginal foster or adoptive homes. The lawsuit alleges that the Government of Canada delegated Indian child welfare services to B.C. Child Welfare and, in so doing, caused ongoing harm to Indian children in care by not taking steps to prevent them from losing their Aboriginal identity and the opportunity to exercise their Aboriginal and treaty rights.

How do I know if I am eligible to participate in the lawsuit?

You may be able to participate in the lawsuit if:

  1. you are (or are entitled to be) a status Indian;
  2. you were living in British Columbia when you were adopted or placed in foster care; and
  3. you were adopted or placed in foster care between 1958 and 1996.

 

How can I join the lawsuit?

Call Klein Lawyers at 604-874-7171 or 1-800-468-4466 (toll-free) or complete the ‘Do You Qualify?’ form. We will send you an information package.

What if I live outside British Columbia?

If you lived in British Columbia between 1962 and 1996 when you were adopted or taken into foster care by a non-Aboriginal family, you may be eligible to be part of the class action lawsuit even if you now live elsewhere. Contact Klein Lawyers for more information.

If you lived outside British Columbia when you were adopted or placed into foster care by a non-Aboriginal family, you should still contact Klein Lawyers to learn how you might be part of another, similar, class action lawsuit.

What if I was sent to a foster or adoptive family outside British Columbia?

You may be eligible to be part of the class action lawsuit even if you were sent to live with a family outside of British Columbia. If you were a status Indian living in British Columbia between 1962 and 1996 when you were adopted or taken into foster care by a non-Aboriginal family, contact Klein Lawyers for more information.

Is the lawsuit only for people who were adopted or placed in foster care in the 1960s?

No. The practice of removing large numbers of Indian children from their families and communities and placing them in the care of non-Aboriginal foster or adoptive homes started in the 1960s and continued into the 1990s. This class action lawsuit concerns status Indians who were living in British Columbia at any point between 1962 and 1996 when they were adopted or placed in foster care.

Does the lawsuit seek compensation for physical and sexual abuse?

No. Although many children were tragically abused by foster and adoptive parents, this class action lawsuit does not seek compensation for individual cases of physical and sexual abuse. This lawsuit is focused on loss of Aboriginal identity and the opportunity to exercise Aboriginal and treaty rights.

 

Will family members be compensated for relatives who have died?

No. Sadly, many status Indian children who were taken from their families and communities have passed away. At present, this class action lawsuit does not seek compensation for family members whose relatives who have died.

Is this part of the Indian Residential Schools Class Action?

No. This class action lawsuit does not concern residential schools. To learn more about the Indian Residential Schools Class Action Settlement, visit www.residentialschoolsettlement.ca or call 1-866-879-4913 (toll-free).

Who is being sued in this lawsuit?

The Government of Canada is the defendant.

Do I have to pay legal fees?

One of the great benefits of class actions is that they are run on contingency fees. This means your lawyers will receive a portion of any settlement or judgment awarded, but otherwise class members are not required to make any payments. The courts ensure all fees are fair and reasonable.

How long will the lawsuit take?

Class action lawsuits typically take many years to resolve. Fortunately, class members have very few responsibilities while a claim is ongoing.